The Sultan: Is Nigeria a Secular or Islamic State?

NIGERIA CONSTITUTIONALLY IS A SECULAR NOT MULTI-RELIGIOUS COUNTRY: FACTUALLY IT IS AN ISLAMIC STATE

Introduction

The Saturday Guardian, August 20, 2016, had the front page captioned “Nobody Can Islamize Nigeria, says Sultan”. The main story on page two of the paper with another caption, “Nobody Can Turn Nigeria to Islamic State” reads: “The Sultan of Sokoto has told Nigerians to forget the fears or suspicion of a grand plan to turn Nigeria into an Islamic State.” Abubakar pointed out yesterday, that it is impossible for a multi-religious country like Nigeria to be converted into a monolithic religious state.” He continued, “It is not possible to Islamize Nigeria. If God had wanted, he would have created all Christians or all Muslims. We are not secular but a multi-religious state because the people are so religious. We must respect one another and understand the tenets of the two religions.”

Discriminatory Appointments against Non-Muslims in Nigeria

Islamist Jihadists of the Hausa, Fulani and Kanuri Ethnic Nationalities, who are Negroid immigrants to Nigeria, are pushing the nation to an implosion. It is therefore imperative that the remaining 386 Ethnic Nationalities of Nigeria should, as a matter of priority, convene a Conference to demonstrate to the few Islamist Jihadists of the three Ethnic Nationalities the grave danger of Islamism as a system of governance.  Nigerians are reminded that the present distress in the nation is not an act of God but man-made. The brazen and audacious imposition of Islamist Jihadists into key positions in the country is not an expression of religious piety but a deliberate manipulation of religion for cultural and political domination by three Ethnic Groups. This Agenda commenced in 1975 after the overthrow of General Gowon. The Islamist Jihadists are a violent and domineering strain of Islam rejected by mainstream Muslims.

Lesson to Nigerian Pastors

BIOGRAPHY OF MOST REV. PATRICK KELLEY

BISHOP KELLY OF WESTERN NIGERIA BY MICHAEL O’SHEA.

 

 
NIGERIA, 1921-1926

In November 1921, after a good holiday, Pat bade farewell to his mother and family at Tristaun and made his way to Dublin and then Liverpool. With him were classmate John Cadogan, Cork, and Michael O’Donohuem Laois; both were two years younger than Pat who was twenty-seven. In Liverpool they spent a few days at the African Missions transit house on Ulett Road, while waiting on the departure of the Elder Dempster liner bound for West Africa. In the city they bought suitable clothing and footwear for the tropics, a pith helmet for protection against the sun, and quinine for Malaria. On boarding ship, the purser directed them to first class cabins; the 1918 Provincial Assembly had decided that the confreres should travel first class. The trio appreciated the comfort, but were a bit ill-at-ease at the thought of rubbing shoulders with colonial nobs in the first class dining hall. As the ship got under way, the new sailors in the Roman collars clutched the rail and spoke quietly as they watched the land recede.

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